Mold in the News: Issue 61

Mold in the News: Issue 61
At Got Mold? our goal is to keep our followers aware of mould related news stories. Each day, we scour the internet looking for relevant information. Here are 15 stories we thought may interest you!
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FEATURED STORY (3)
USC, Benedict Dorms Have Mold Issue

Airdrie woman in kitchen repair hell: An Airdrie woman says she has been forced to move out of her home after delayed repairs to a mouldy kitchen. Lyndsey Holmes had new kitchen units installed three months ago at her Laggan Road bedsit, but they then had to be taken back down after mould developed inside them. The 22-year-old claims she has been waiting ever since for units to be restored at the council property in Burnfoot, and has had to move in with family due to the mould. She said: “I can’t live in the house at the moment because of the smell from the mould – I’ve moved in with my mum because it’s pure hell.
Homeowners dealing with post-Isaac mold issues: Weeks after Hurricane Isaac caused widespread flooding and power outages in South Mississippi, people are still tearing out drywall and throwing away furniture covered in mold. Mold spores are a familiar foe for those who live in the low-lying areas of Hancock County. They fought them after Hurricane Katrina in 2005, then Gustav in 2008 and now Isaac. All three caused heavy flooding in Pearlington and elsewhere. Isaac pushed 16 inches of water into Racquel Barnhart’s home in the Oak Harbor area, where it stayed for several hours. “This entire neighborhood was flooded,” she said. “We all had mold. When we pulled out the (drywall), there was mold, mold on wood, mold on the furniture, mold on the cabinets. If you didn’t have mold, I don’t know how that was possible.”
MOLD and HEALTH (3)
Mold still a problem for some weeks after storm: Weeks after Hurricane Isaac caused widespread flooding and power outages in South Mississippi, people are still tearing out drywall and throwing away furniture covered in mold. Mold spores are a familiar foe for those who live in the low-lying areas of Hancock County. They fought them after Hurricane Katrina in 2005, then Gustav in 2008 and now Isaac. All three caused heavy flooding in Pearlington and elsewhere. Isaac pushed 16 inches of water into Racquel Barnhart’s home in the Oak Harbor area, where it stayed for several hours.
Tips for improving the air quality in your home: When you think about home safety, you probably think about smoke detectors or child-proof cabinet locks and not necessarily about the quality of the air you breathe. But you should, according to Fred Hutchinson, the president and CEO of Hutchinson Plumbing Heating Cooling. Americans spend a lot of time indoors, especially in the fall and winter, and indoor air can be full of pollutants, allergens, bacteria and germs, which can lead to respiratory conditions and the flu. “The air inside your home can actually be two to five times dirtier than the air outside,” Hutchinson said. Here are some ways to improve the air quality in your home:
Mold worry moves Lumbee vets office: Two volunteers at the Lumbee Tribe’s Office of Veterans Affairs say that the Lumbee Tribal Council is endangering the health of veterans and staff by not dealing with a mold problem at the office on Union Chapel Road. They also say that the council has allowed the office to operate for two years without heat and air conditioning. In a letter to The Robesonian, Veterans Services Officers Ronnie Brooks and Greg Jacobs contend that the Tribal Council has known about the mold infestation since the building was tested for mold in January 2011. A second study conducted last month “clearly shows that the building has a high level of mold,” the letter reads.
MOLD IN SCHOOLS (5)
Mold problem at University of SC dorm, some students relocated: The University of South Carolina is working to eliminate a mold infestation from a 73-year-old dorm that forced some students out of their rooms. Students began noticing mold forming in some Sims dorm rooms two weeks ago, and the school reacted with letters to parents, inspections and testing. After getting test results, three of the dorm’s 117 rooms required enough cleaning to move six students to new housing, USC spokesman Wes Hickman said. Another nine students with histories of respiratory ailments have chosen to leave Sims, he said.
Fatal mould at Palo Seco Govt Sec school: A report submitted by the Caribbean Industrial Research Institute (CARIRI) on the problem at the Palo Seco Government Secondary School, SS Erin Road, has indicated the presence of mould which can cause various symptoms, including headaches, rashes, respiratory and asthmatic conditions. The mould can be fatal to persons with weakened immune systems. Asked about the report yesterday, Education Minister Dr Tim Gopeesingh, said based on the report the school has not been given the all-clear for students and teachers to return and “more work needs to be done.” Speaking to reporters at St Mary’s College following the presentation of laptops to Form One students, Gopeesingh said some of the students were being housed in another area and ministry officials were at the school yesterday. “We hope to sort the problem out.”
5 Montevallo Elementary School classrooms to be relocated due to mold: Five classrooms at Montevallo Elementary School will be temporarily relocated to portable classrooms to allow for mold cleanup, Shelby County school officials said today. Deputy Superintendent Tom Ferguson announced today that the relocation was prompted by the results of air quality testing conducted by ERG Environmental. The report indicates that there is one classroom with the presence of Stachybotrys mold spores, likely caused when recent heavy rainfall created a drainage problem.
Mold May Close Prescott Elementary: A second elementary school in Scranton may shut down because of a mold problem. However, school officials hope this closure will only be temporary. Mold was first found in the cafeteria at Prescott Elementary in the spring, and now school officials are trying to decide if it’s safe for kids to be there while the mold is cleaned up. It’s a dilemma folks in the Hill Section are familiar with, since another school in that part of town closed permanently earlier this year. Bonnie Gayda of Scranton picks up her granddaughter from preschool at Prescott Elementary every Friday. This week, with a little uncertainty, since hearing that the school may close temporarily because of a mold problem.
Cheapest St. Charles E. rec center mold fix: Raze it: The site of recent mold on the St. Charles East High School campus may be demolished if District 303 school board members choose the cheapest option presented to them Thursday night. Taxpayers have already plunked down about $94,000 to remediate mold found in the ceilings and walls of three racquetball courts inside the John B. Norris Recreation Center. The school district took over maintenance of the recreation center in recent years as students make heavy use of the swimming pool, which needed expensive repairs the not-for-profit recreation center couldn’t afford.
MOLD IN PUBLIC BUILDINGS (4)
City pledges £300k per year to tackle damp and mould in council homes: WINCHESTER civic chiefs have earmarked £300,000 a year to tackle mould and damp in council homes. Councillors say that major investment in extraction fans is necessary to tackle the effects of condensation. Over the next six to seven years, civic chiefs hope all council dwellings will be fitted with extraction fans to both kitchens and bathrooms.
Residents Say Mold Complaints Were Ignored: I am standing in Shadae Stephens’ kitchen looking at the cupboard underneath her sink. There’s black gunk and a lot of it. It appears to be mold. Stephens is one of several people who lives at Westlake Apartments who contacted News 3 saying they have been living with mold in their units for months, and in some cases, years. They told me they had contacted the property manager to no avail. “”So it’s basically them not doing anything to fix up our apartments, we’re basically on our own, and that’s why we came to you for help because we need help,” Stephens tells me.

Mold forces Fargo congregation to find new church: After leaving her church because of a worsening mold problem, one area pastor said she and her congregation consider the move somewhat of a blessing. “It’s a good opportunity for us to take a deep breath … a mold-free breath,” said Pastor Anne Dilenschneider, laughing. “A good, healthy breath and we’ll see where we’re called next.” Dilenschneider’s north Fargo Edgewood United Methodist Church has had a mold problem the past two years, brought on by flooding in the area.
Residents at Westlake Apartments Say Repair Work is Beginning: Crews were onsite of the Westlake Apartments in west Savannah Friday preparing to inspect all 100 units, according to several residents who had complained to WSAV about mold concerns. A statement yesterday from the management company, PK Management out of South Carolina said it would aggressively investigate all claims of moisture damage and make repairs if needed. Shadae Stephens and Calesia Gardner and two other residents showed us their apartments earlier this week. We saw what appeared to be mold in bathrooms, on vents and window sills as well as along some floors in bathrooms. In Stephens case, the faucet in her bathtub had been running for a month, she said she couldn’t turn it off. A mold remediation expert, Roger Von Duyke told us after he looked at our tape, that it appeared there leak problems throughout the apartments.