Mold in the News: Issue 96

Mold in the News: Issue 96
At Got Mold? our goal is to keep our followers aware of mould related news stories. Each day, we scour the internet looking for relevant information. Here are 14 stories we thought may interest you!
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FEATURED STORIES (3)
Mum and twins “forced out” by mould invasion: A MUM and her five-year-old twin children claim they are being “forced out” of their home by an invasion of damp and mould that council landlords “won’t do anything about”. Kelly Garman, 24, says the young family have been blighted by the problem – which started two years ago – and have been left frustrated that she has only been issued advice in all that time.
Man says mold in apartment making him sick; claims complex won’t: A man says there is mold growing in his South Charlotte apartment and it’s making him and his family sick. The man, who only wants to be known as Bobby, showed WBTV pictures of black spots around the bedroom wall. He says despite several complaints, it took his complex months to rip out the carpet and replace the floors.
Moisture on pipes fed mold: The mold infestation that shut the Guilmette School for most of the 2010-11 school year was caused by moisture collecting on frigid air conditioning pipes that were improperly insulated against the summer heat, a lawyer hired to recover the cost of the cleanup told city councilors last night. The report on the cause of the infestation came as city Budget Director Mark Ianello told the councilors that as much as $3 million more may be needed to pay for rebuilding the interior of the elementary and middle school following the interior demolition needed to get at the mold.
MOLD and HEALTH (1)
Black mould danger spreads across Coast Local Gold Coast News: A DANGEROUS mould outbreak has triggered a health warning with harmful fungi appearing in homes across the Gold Coast and covering interior walls, ceilings, furniture, clothes and even shoes. Local mould removalists report business has jumped by up to 400 per cent since the start of the big wet in late January as residents discover black mould rapidly growing throughout their homes.
MOLD IN SCHOOLS (4)
Classes cancelled at Valleyfield school due to spreading mould: Classes are cancelled until Thursday at the Gault Institute in Salaberry-de-Valleyfield. While other students return from March Break, a mould problem at Gault seems to be more widespread than first thought. Workers dispatched to test and remove the mould over March Break found more mould than expected, leaving some parents worried about the future of their school. Health Inspectors though, caution that they have yet to see anything alarming. “I just want reports. I just want them to show us the reports,” said Catherine Blouin, a concerned parent. “It’s easy to say there’s a little bit of mould here, a little bit of mould there, but we want to see the reports. We want to keep our kids and staff safe and healthy.”
California Middle School’s Leaking Roof Creates Mold Concerns: Last month, the Ventura County Star reported about concerns from parents and faculty at Fillmore Middle School. According to the report, the 12 year old school in Fillmore, California, has been plagued with roof leaks that in recent years have gotten much worse and now mold has been discovered growing in the school. “There were leaks in the past, but they were not as significant as this year. This year has been the tipping point,” said Earl Davis, interim assistant superintendent for the Fillmore Unified School District. “This has gone from being a maintenance issue with occasional roof leaks to what could potentially become a health and safety issue.”
Mold, bacteria and lead found in testing at Hamilton High School West: Parts of Hamilton High School West will likely remain closed for the rest of the school year after a report found bacteria, lead-based paint and mold in some athletic areas. Superintendent James Parla asked the environmental firm Karl and Associates to test the areas of the building after closing them last week. Obtained by the Trentonian through an Open Public Records Act request, the report found evidence of mold spores, coliform, E. Coli, Legionella and other bacteria as well as lead-based paint in the closed-off areas of the school. “These areas will not be used until they are properly remediated,” he said.
Wayland Baptist working to determine mold cause in off-campus apartment: Wayland Baptist University in Plainview is working to determine the water source that caused mold in two units of an off-campus apartment building. As a precautionary measure, the university relocated 25 residents Feb. 19 from the Llano apartment building, located less than a mile east of campus, so the school’s administration could deal with the presence of “actively growing mold spores” in two of the 12 units.
MOLD IN PUBLIC BUILDINGS (2)
Black mold present in Mason County Jail: The presence of black mold has been discovered at the Mason County Sheriff’s Office which has closed parts of the county jail, according to a report from the Mason County Press. It is likely the mold has developed from leaks caused by the jail’s showers, from water leaking from an exterior wall and from the recycled air in the building, the Press reports.
Leaky roof, mould a problem from the start for Elliot Lake library: Staff from the Elliot Lake library testified Tuesday about “deplorable” conditions at the Algo Centre Mall, on the seventh day of a public inquiry into the mall’s deadly collapse last year. Former chief librarian Barbara Fazekas said the roof wouldn’t leak as soon as it started raining, but water would gather and start coming into the library. Fazekas said the library suffered from water damage and poor air quality from the time it moved into the mall in this northern Ontario town in 1989.
MISC. (4)
Breaking the mould with damp houses in Thurrock: Council’s pilot scheme to remove damp and mould on the Flowers Estate in South Ockendon is already making some headway in transforming the lives of many tenants. Since the scheme began last August, over 300 visits have been made to properties in which 218 ventilation units have been serviced and 25 new units have been installed. Gaye Atkins who lives in Rosemary Close with her husband and family had huge problems with damp and mould since they moved into the property six years ago.
Tackling mould challenges: It’s been more than four months since Superstorm Sandy devastated much of the Eastern Seaboard, but many residents affected by the massive storm are still dealing with the storm’s effects. Mould has become a major problem for homeowners hit by Sandy. In fact, Members of US Congress have even taken up the cause, calling mould an “emerging crisis.” Canadian Insurance Top Broker spoke with Rory MacKinnon, a field operations specialist at Paul Davis Systems, to discuss the mould remediation process and what brokers should know about this dangerous fungus.
Marion selectmen reject low bidder for mold removal: Plans to deal with a mold problem in the Town House basement have been delayed after the selectmen rejected the low bidder for the project contract. The board raised concerns over the contractor’s lack of actual mold removal experience. Town Administrator Paul Dawson was recommending that the company be approved for the project despite having no specific background in mold remediation. Dawson said the low bidder has done de-leading, so is certified for environmental services. He added that the contractor appeared well-versed with the job specifications and with what needs to be done.
Battle against mold worth fighting: It may start with a couple of small dark spots on the grout where the shower stall meets the tiled wall. A few days later, they multiply. “For most people it’s just kind of an ugly pain. Their bathroom gets these black stains,” said Ken Collier, editor-in-chief of The Family Handyman. For others, though, “it’s an allergen, like cat hair, dog hair,” he said. If it’s not removed, it can result in respiratory problems or other allergy symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.