Asbestosis causes and symptoms

Asbestosis is a harmful lung condition that is developed in people who have inhaled asbestos dust and fibres. When someone inhales the dust, the microscopic asbestos fibres settle in the lungs, where they may cause permanent lung damage as well as chronic breathing symptoms. The fibres aren’t able to release themselves from the organs inside as they are sharp tiny shards that stick to your lungs for a lifetime.

One of the unusual things about asbestosis is the long wait between asbestos exposure and the resulting illness. For many people they may have been exposed to it at one particular time in their lives or careers and were not diagnosed until 15-30 years later. It does not show up in any kind of test results immediately.

Once someone develops asbestosis, no cures are currently available. Breathing problems will get steadily worse, and in about 15% of people, severe shortness of breath and respiratory failure develop. For someone who smokes and has had asbestos exposure, there is a greatly increased chance of developing lung cancer. Symptoms may appear within 10 years of the initial exposure. OH&S has recommended testing in homes built up to the year 2000 now as asbestos is being found in buildings built even in the 1990’s.

Lung transplantation is the only way to manage end-stage asbestos lung disease, and most people who need it are not eligible candidates because of their advanced age or due to other medical problems.

Worsening in your breathing occurs as asbestosis progresses. Cough, sputum production, and wheezing are less common and are generally associated with smoking. You may display what is known as clubbing of the fingertips (they thicken and enlarge), or develop a blue colour under your nails and a bluish tinge around your mouth.

Even brief exposure to asbestos at some time in the past will dramatically increase the risk of developing lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma (a rare, fatal cancer of the lining of organs such as the lungs, abdomen, and chest).

Some research has also shown that asbestos causes an increased risk of developing cancers of the esophagus, stomach, intestines, and rectum. This may be related to the swallowing of asbestos fibres that were inhaled and then coughed up from the lungs. If you are a smoker who has been exposed to asbestos over the long term, your likelihood of developing lung cancer is greatly increased. It appears that there is a “dose-response relationship” between asbestos exposure, smoking, and lung cancer: the greater the exposure to both asbestos and cigarette smoke, the higher the risk of cancer. It’s already proven the health risks of smoking and the links to cancer but the chances increase 80% when exposed to asbestos. Researches at the University of Michigan believe that it is from tar build up in the lungs and holding the fibres in place, then coughing up the fibres to be spread throughout the body.

got mold?™ New Office in Regina, SK

The number of calls got mold?™ receives in Southern Saskatchewan has prompted the company to yet again expand its business by hiring a Manager and opening a new office in Regina. As of February 8, 2016, Mr. Mike Cornford has assumed the role of Regional Manager for Southern Saskatchewan and will be responsible for overseeing all aspects of got mold?™ Regina operations.

Regina got moldgot mold?™ specializes in finding and fixing sources of unhealthy indoor air; sources which include mold, asbestos, radon, MVOC’s, VOC’s, bacteria from sewer backup and a variety of other contaminants. Calls to got mold?™ originate from insurance companies, commercial, industrial & institutional clients as well as residential customers who typically have either experienced a major event such as fire or flood, or they are having health concerns while in the built environment, notice a smell, or they physically see something they suspect may be affecting the quality of their indoor air. In some cases, there are no visible signs of contamination, but troublesome physical symptoms appear such as headaches, nausea, skin irritation or breathing challenges.

In all cases, got mold?™ is able to respond by having a skilled investigator examine the building for potential causes of unhealthy indoor air. The investigations are extensive and involve a variety of techniques, technology and if necessary a sampling strategy. Certified 3rd party labs analyze all samples and the results, positive or negative, are compiled and presented to the client in form of a report.

When it comes to removing contaminants, got mold?™ teams go to work utilizing the experience they have gained through the completion of more than 3000 projects throughout Saskatchewan and Alberta. got mold?™ is certified in all the latest contaminant management techniques and does not cut corners.

Contact Regina Office

Use Caution If Using Sprays to Remove Mold

 

Use Caution If Using Sprays to Remove Mold

Don’t misinterpret the mass of information available to consumers regarding mold and how to get rid of it. Mold awareness and its potential impact on indoor air quality has given rise to a growing increasing list of so-called mold remedies and mold remediation strategies.  In the last few years for example, anti-microbial sprays such as Concrobium have received attention as a good way to kill mold. The reality is, there will always be various options and opinions on what product to use and where to use it, but what is not disputed is that visible mold growth occupying an area larger than 10 square feet needs to be dealt with by either a professional or at the very least by someone following the advice of a professional. Proper remediation of mold may have less to do with the product than the technique used in conjunction with the product.
But don’t be mislead, mistakes can be made by selecting the wrong product as well. For example, when consulted about proper product and technique in a large crawlspace, Dr. Jackson Kung’u, a well respected Microbiologist had this to say:

“For removal of extensive mold growth from floor joists in the crawlspace, I would personally recommend dry ice blasting for the following reasons:

  1. Unlike use of biocides, dry ice blasting does not add moisture to the wood and it’s non-toxic and therefore poses no health risks to the operators and the occupants.
  2. Dry ice blasting does not damage the wood at all, but it removes and kills the mold at the same time.
  3. Blasting does not stain the wood.”
When consulted about proper technique in a smaller area, Dr. Kung’u said:
“If the mold growth is not extensive and deeply embedded into the wood, you may spray an anti-microbial and let it set for a few hours. After the antimicrobial kills the mold then you physically go back with HEPA vacuums, and rags, and brushes, and wipe the wood. This is a more tedious process if cleaning big areas … and may not be cost effective.”
Interestingly, even “less toxic” bio sprays need to be used with full safety considerations.  Appropriate personal protective equipment is required for application of antimicrobials, including a chemical- resistant suit, heavy gloves and full-face respirator with OVR cartridges.  Moreover, the area in which the mold is being treated requires a complete industry standard protocol of containment, air management, removal process, cleaning process, drying process and finally, post remediation, lab verified clearance testing to make sure the job was actually completed with the results intended.

Read More:
http://www.gotmold.ca/2012/09/dont-spray-mold/

The Truth About Popcorn Ceilings & asbestos

Depending on the year of your home popcorn or acoustic spray are likely to contain asbestos, a known carcinogen. Popcorn Ceilings were very popular from 1950 until 1978, when the application was banned, because it allowed builders to obscure bad sheet rock installations. When considering doing home renovations you should definitely get a sample taken before you begin any removal to make sure you don’t have asbestos fibres to worry about.

Not all popcorn ceiling contains asbestos, even if the home was built or renovated during the times in which asbestos was most commonly used. Getting a professional to collect the sample is the safest route to take before you begin any removal. If the ceiling is not disrupted, you may wish to consider getting the professional to do the sampling.

You cannot be sure that a material contains asbestos by just looking at it with the naked eye. Therefore, treat all suspect materials as if they contain asbestos.

  • Shut down any heating or cooling systems to minimize the spread of any released fibers.
  • Do not disturb the material any more than is needed to take a small sample.
  • Wet the material using a fine mist of water containing a few drops of detergent before taking the sample. The water/detergent mist will reduce the possibility of releasing asbestos fibers.
  • Carefully cut/scrape a piece from the entire depth of the material using, for example, a small knife, corer, or other sharp object.
  • Collect Multiple samples from different areas of the ceiling preferably to the depth of the material and approximately 2-3 inches long. (This allows enough material for a proper sample to be analyzed)

Credible companies can get the results back in 24 hours or less if you request for a rush sample. It is recommended that the home owner or business owner get a professional to come and collect the sample to decrease the chances of exposure and the proper amount of material is collected.