Mold Awareness Month Part 3 of 4

As part of mold awareness month, got mold? wants to educate our readers on as much helpful and interesting information about mold awareness as possible. This is why we have conducted a 4 part mold awareness segment for the previous articles please read
part 1 & part 2

For this article we wanted to address the issues of what not to do when you find mold in your home. Many people do things that they will later regret because it causes contamination in the homes by doing things people tell you to do on youtube or by googling answers and not finding the right answers from a reliable source but from someone with little to no experience in the professional mold removal field of services.

There seems to be lots of mis-information on the Internet recommending that you spray chemicals on mold. This article explains why spraying mold will in fact make the situation worse.
WHAT IS MOLD?
Molds are a type of fungi and are neither plant nor animal. There are over 100,000 types of mold with at least 1,000 types found in North America and live in colonies growing on food, fabric, bathroom walls, construction materials, and soil. Mold proliferates through the release of spores into the air we breathe and are not visible to the naked eye.
Indoor molds cause two key problems.
1. They destroy the material that they feed on, including bathroom walls, carpets, insulation, and ceilings.
2. Exposure to high concentrations of certain types of mold creates health problems. For this reason, materials that are infected with mold need to be removed. In fact, mold is like a cancer, unless it is dealt with and removed, it will continue to grow. The only way to deal with mold is to eradicate it.
HOW DOES MOLD GROW?
Most homes and buildings have mold because they offer the three ingredients mold needs to grow:
1. Food, which includes materials high in cellulose content such as paper and wood. Drywall, wallpaper, carpet, ceiling tiles, dust, and dirt, are also food sources for mold.
2. Temperatures of 5 degrees to 38 degrees present the perfect environment for mold.
3. Finally, water is the key ingredient. Mold can not grow without moisture. Where there is moisture, you will find mold. This is one of the reasons that leaking pipes, roofs and ceiling, sewer backups, floods, and condensation end up causing mold issues.
Mold is a growing concern because we spend up to 90 percent of our time indoors, creating a situation ripe for health issues.
KILLING MOLD IS NOT THE ANSWER!
Getting rid of mold by applying bleach or chemicals is NOT the answer to the problem because dead mold spores are just as harmful to the human lung as live spores. You may have read or heard about the myth of the “Mummy’s Curse” in which all of the Archaeologists that discovered King Tutankhamen’s Tomb eventually died. They, in fact, died from dead aspergillus mold spores that laid dormant for centuries!
In addition, mold spores like Aspergillus and Stachybotrys (black mold) are toxic in both a live form and a dead form. The key to proper mold removal is to remove all of the mold spores.
Mold is toxic and can cause many health issues. In fact, mold produces mycotoxins that are pathogenic to animals and humans. In 2011 we posted an article on the uses of mold as a biological weapon to illustrate just how toxic mold is.

 

There seems to be a misconception that getting rid of mold by applying bleach or chemicals is the answer to the problem. This is actually not the case because dead mold spores are just as harmful to the human lung as live spores.
There is actually a historical anecdote about the toxic nature of dead mold spores. You probably have heard of the myth of the “Mummy’s Curse” in which all of the Archaeologists that discovered King Tutankhamen’s Tomb eventually died. In 1922, a team of British archeologists in Egypt found the tomb and by 1929, the eleven people associated with the tomb died of early and “unnatural” causes and this is how the myth of the “Mummy’s Curse” evolved. In reality, the actual cause of death of was the result of inhaling dead Aspergillus mold spores and this is the reason that Archaeologists today wear respirators and suits when they are on a dig site.
In addition, mold spores like Aspergillus and Stachybotrys (black mold) are toxic in both a live form and a dead form. The key to proper mold removal is to remove all of the mold spores. This is what Got Mold? does and the reason we follow an Eight Step Process on all of our projects. Our ultimate goal is to provide Health & Longevity to our clients, their friends, and family.
If you discover mold in your home, don’t take this issue lightly and review one of our earlier articles on Mold Do’s and Don’ts. We give you straight forward information to help you stay healthy and to prevent further spread of spores in your home or business.
Mold is toxic and can cause many health issues. In fact, mold produces mycotoxins that are pathogenic to animals and humans. In 2011 we posted an article on the uses of mold as a biological weapon to illustrate just how toxic mold is.

For more information or if you have any questions regarding mold removal we are always here to help! Don’t hesitate to call and book a consultation or inspection.

A Reasoned Approach To Mold Contamination: Best Practices

A Reasoned Approach To Mold Contamination: Best Practices
got mold’s mission and quest is to create awareness and help educate consumers about the growing concerns about mold. Because of our mission, we are fortunate to be given the opportunity to work with industry experts, including Michael Pinto, who share our belief that an educated consumer will be able to make better decisions and choices. Michael currently serves as Chief Executive Officer of Wonder Makers Environmental, Inc. He has more than 30 years of safety and environmental experience from jobs in the private sector, the non-profit arena, and regulatory agencies. Michael is the author of five books, over 150 published articles, and 18 commercial training programs. Michael has graciously allowed Got Mold? to re-publish the article below so that we can share his knowledge and expertise.
Indoor air quality is a broad field that continues to impact safety, health, and environmental professionals. But the shift in focus over the last five years from general concerns such as adequate ventilation and sick building syndrome to mold contamination has caught many practitioners by surprise. Today, safety managers, industrial hygienists, loss prevention specialists, and risk assessors are frequently being asked to explain mold contamination to building occupants, the media, and the public.

Full article “A Reasoned Approach to Mold Contamination: Best Practices” See Mold Sensitized 

Deposition Of Airborne Spores On Surfaces: The Forgotten Aspect of Mold Remediation

Deposition Of Airborne Spores On Surfaces: The Forgotten Aspect of Mold Remediation
got mold’s mission and quest is to create awareness and help educate consumers about the growing concerns about mold. Because of our mission, we are fortunate to be given the opportunity to work with industry experts, including Michael Pinto, who share our belief that an educated consumer will be able to make better decisions and choices. Michael currently serves as Chief Executive Officer of Wonder Makers Environmental, Inc. He has more than 30 years of safety and environmental experience from jobs in the private sector, the non-profit arena, and regulatory agencies. Michael is the author of five books, over 150 published articles, and 18 commercial training programs. Michael has graciously allowed Got Mold? to re-publish the article below so that we can share his knowledge and expertise.
In the mold remediation industry the focus tends to be, understandably, on areas where mold is growing on building materials or contents. The EPA and the New York City (NYC) Department of Health have published guidelines that offer recommendations for personal protective equipment (PPE) and engineering controls based on the amount of visible mold growth in an area. Obviously, visible mold growth needs to be properly addressed. However, physical growth is not the only form of contamination related to mold. Spores released by mold sources can settle on surfaces that are not otherwise contaminated by mold growth. This spore deposition can remain long after the actual mold growth is removed and can continue to cause symptoms if it is not dealt with. In this article, we will discuss (1) how to determine if airborne spore deposition has impacted surfaces, (2) how to clean surfaces that have been impacted by airborne spores, and (3) how to determine if the cleaning was effective in removing the deposited mold contamination.

Full article “Deposition Of Airborne Spores On Surfaces: The Forgotten Aspect of Mold Remediation” See Mold Sensitized 

Ozone Generators and Interior Mold Remediation: A Recipe for Disaster

Ozone Generators and Interior Mold Remediation: A Recipe for Disaster
Got Mold?‘s mission and quest is to create awareness and help educate consumers about the growing concerns about mold. Because of our mission, we are fortunate to be given the opportunity to work with industry experts, including Michael Pinto, who share our belief that an educated consumer will be able to make better decisions and choices. Michael currently serves as Chief Executive Officer of Wonder Makers Environmental, Inc. He has more than 30 years of safety and environmental experience from jobs in the private sector, the non-profit arena, and regulatory agencies. Michael is the author of five books, over 150 published articles, and 18 commercial training programs. Michael has graciously allowed Got Mold? to re-publish the article below so that we can share his knowledge and expertise.
As an instructor for mold remediation and indoor air quality investigation classes I am frequently asked about the effectiveness and appropriateness of using ozone generators during mold remediation. Many students are coming from the fire restoration industry where ozone generators are often used to remove smoke orders from contents. For other students the questions about the effectiveness of ozone for mold work are prompted by equipment vendors who indicate that ozone generating machines are perfect for the task. The potential benefit of resolving the toughest mold problems by simply plugging in a machine that “kills mold dead” sounds too good to be true – and it is!
Full article “Ozone Generators and Interior Mold Remediation: A Recipe for Disaster” See Mold Sensitized

Do People Really Get Sick From a Little Mold in Their House?

Do People Really Get Sick From a Little Mold in Their House?
Got Mold?’s mission and quest is to create awareness and help educate consumers about the growing concerns about mold. Because of our mission, we are fortunate to be given the opportunity to work with industry experts, including Michael Pinto, who share our belief that an educated consumer will be able to make better decisions and choices. Michael currently serves as Chief Executive Officer of Wonder Makers Environmental, Inc. He has more than 30 years of safety and environmental experience from jobs in the private sector, the non-profit arena, and regulatory agencies. Michael is the author of five books, over 150 published articles, and 18 commercial training programs. Michael has graciously allowed Got Mold? to re-publish the article below so that we can share his knowledge and expertise.
The debate continues to rage. The positions are as polarized as ever. Every new study is scrutinized and dissected with each side pulling tidbits, usually out of context, to support their view. It sounds like the discussion of politics in Washington, D.C. but, unfortunately, it is something that hits restoration contractors much closer to home. The debate is about mold. Specifically, health effects that can reasonably be attributed to mold. And more specifically, health effects that can be attributed to mold at exposure levels that are typically found in homes with limited water damage.

Full article “Do People Really Get Sick From a Little Mold in Their House?” See Mold Sensitized