Good News for US Military Families

Good News for US Military Families
“Every single mold growing in there was high concentrated, you had staff in there that had mold growing on their clothes, on their suits, on their military uniforms, their hats,” said Brown.”
“It hurts very much that they knew this was going on, and with that information, refused to share it with us,” said Tracy Brown, a counselor at the Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Program, also known as SARP, located for almost 30 years inside building J-50.
“There is a common business axiom, and that is to inspect what you expect, and we all expect completely adequate housing that is clean and safe.” (Congressman Scott Rigell)
Since April, 2012, Got Mold? has been tracking the issue of mold in the military and reporting the news cases in Mold in the News. In addition, we have tried to increase public awareness of this issue by researching and writing specific articles we post to our blog:
1. Mold in the Military Update
2. Got Mold? Actively Engaging School Boards and the Military
3. Does the Military Really Care About Mold?
On April 18th, 2012, WKTR reported that Congressman Scott Rigell proposed new legislation, Military Housing Oversight and Accountability Act, that will mandate the military to step in and watch over the maintenance and upkeep of both old and new housing. Well it appears, that Congressman Rigel’s efforts were well worth it.

The legislation was passed earlier this year and requires each branch of the military to report to Congress twice a year on the financial health of each housing partnership, how money is being spent, and if there is a backlog of maintenance requests.
For military families living with mold issues this is a great relief.
“Obviously if a bill was introduced and signed into law, we’ve got someone in our corner. Someone actually listened to us,” said Angela Walker, one of many military wives dealing with mold issues.
“You felt like there was no hope, that nobody was listening. It was us, up against these big companies, and they were winning. Now I’m really happy there is a law helping us.”
Let’s keep our fingers crossed and hope that this new law will ensure the health and safety of military families. My sincere hope is the Canadian government and other government’s around the world will follow the lead of this new American initiative.

Does the Military Really Care About Mold?

Does the Military Really Care About Mold?
“Every single mold growing in there was high concentrated, you had staff in there that had mold growing on their clothes, on their suits, on their military uniforms, their hats,” said Brown.”
“It hurts very much that they knew this was going on, and with that information, refused to share it with us,” said Tracy Brown, a counselor at the Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Program, also known as SARP, located for almost 30 years inside building J-50.
A recent news posting-The Navy’s $10 million mold problem-highlights the problems the military is facing with mold.

Call me a cynic, but it is clear from this news report that the only reason the Navy did anything is because this story became public.
1. In 2009, Navy industrial hygienist teams found high concentrations of mold on air vents, furniture, ceiling tiles, cabinets, and inside closets all around the building. Despite the fact that personnel in the building were complaining of sicknesses, nothing was done.
2. A year later, in 2010, the same mold results were found and a power point presentation by the Lieutenant Commander Eric Pauli, the head of SARP at the time, spelled it out for the Navy Brass: “Problems with mold and the broken HVAC system adversely affect health, comfort, and safety of staff, patients, and visitors…[Mold can] grow in human tissue, and for people with weakened immune systems, this growth can eventually be fatal.”
Was anything done about this situation? NO. The military values its personnel only for one thing…to fight wars. But back in home territory, it is clear that health, particularly when it is caused by bad air quality, is a minor issue. Trillions are spent on war. Why does the United States government, Congress, and military brass fail to understand that the buildings they house their personnel in must be safe and healthy environments?
I wonder, how many other military buildings are causing the personnel to be sick? I guess we will only know if more complaints are filed and more news reports are made public.
In this case, a year after Lieutenant Pauli submitted his report and only after a formal complaint about the sick working conditions was filed was anything done. SARP moved to another building, hopefully mold free. Mold, of course, was not the official reason for the move; after all the military would not want to admit they had a problem would they! “I knew it was the mold, that’s the reason we were moving, but has it ever been said to us? No,” said Brown.
What do you think? Do you think the military actually cares and will do something? I only think something will be done if and only when enough complaints are filed and enough news reports are generated that will basically embarrass the military, Congress, and the government into taking this issue more seriously. They should, but will they? Tell me what you think!!!

Mold in the Military Update

Mold in the Military Update

“There is a common business axiom, and that is to inspect what you expect, and we all expect completely adequate housing that is clean and safe.” (Congressman Scott Rigell)

Recently CNN reported about “Mold in the Military”:
CNN Special Report – Military Mold Part 1

CNN Special Report – Military Mold Part 2

It appears that the laws for military housing may be changing to address this housing situation. Congressman Scott Rigell is introducing the Military Housing Oversight and Accountability Act which mandates the military to step in and watch over the maintenance and upkeep of both old and new housing.

Mold in the News: Issue 3

Mold in the News: Issue 3
At Got Mold? our goal is to keep our followers aware of mold related news stories. Each day, we scour the internet looking for relevant information. Here are some stories we thought may interest you!
Family’s mould hell: A couple whose infant daughter is suffering from a chronic cough say they have had to fight a 10-year battle to be moved from their mould-infested home. Sabrina and Danny Ebanks-Thornback say they have endured eight years in a damp housing association home – only to be moved into a second mouldy property.
Chelsea Hotel Mold Investigation in Atlantic City: CBS 3 I-Team went undercover, and beyond the glitzy lobby, beach views and swanky dining at the Chelsea Hotel in Atlantic City, we found what appeared to be mold in a number of rooms: guest rooms, utility rooms, and storage rooms where we saw cots and cribs.
Return of the Mold Monster: Military Housing Sucks, Corrupt Government Contractor: NewsChannel 3’s investigation into mold in military housing is getting results for military families. Lincoln Military Housing is spending millions to try to solve the problems our exclusive investigation uncovered three months ago, hoping to make things right with their residents at home. But at the same time, the company is trying to get off the hook in the courtroom.
Mould in schools a concern for union, parents: The union representing elementary school teachers in Ontario say parents and school boards must be vigilant about the spread of mould in school buildings and portables. Peter Guiliani, the head of the Ottawa-Carleton local of the Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario, said his union has complained about mould in Ottawa schools on behalf of both staff and students, and said parents should do the same.
Police union links mould to legionnaires: The WA Police Union believes continuing issues of mould at a station in the Pilbara may have contributed to an officer contracting Legionnaires disease. Both the Karratha and South Hedland police stations had severe mould problems last year. Some officers had to be relocated to nearby stations as a result.
44% of reserve homes in Canada have mould: Snaw’Naw’As Chief David Bob stands by the stoop of a faded two-storey home that has seen better days. The white paint is peeling off the door and the porch is sagging beneath its own weight. The dilapidated house was built more than two decades ago when homes weren’t constructed to withstand the wet coastal weather, and like others its age, it’s vulnerable to black mould. Mouldy reserve homes in Canada are amounting to a national crisis and First Nations in Nanoose and Nanaimo are not immune.