Good News for US Military Families

Good News for US Military Families
“Every single mold growing in there was high concentrated, you had staff in there that had mold growing on their clothes, on their suits, on their military uniforms, their hats,” said Brown.”
“It hurts very much that they knew this was going on, and with that information, refused to share it with us,” said Tracy Brown, a counselor at the Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Program, also known as SARP, located for almost 30 years inside building J-50.
“There is a common business axiom, and that is to inspect what you expect, and we all expect completely adequate housing that is clean and safe.” (Congressman Scott Rigell)
Since April, 2012, Got Mold? has been tracking the issue of mold in the military and reporting the news cases in Mold in the News. In addition, we have tried to increase public awareness of this issue by researching and writing specific articles we post to our blog:
1. Mold in the Military Update
2. Got Mold? Actively Engaging School Boards and the Military
3. Does the Military Really Care About Mold?
On April 18th, 2012, WKTR reported that Congressman Scott Rigell proposed new legislation, Military Housing Oversight and Accountability Act, that will mandate the military to step in and watch over the maintenance and upkeep of both old and new housing. Well it appears, that Congressman Rigel’s efforts were well worth it.

The legislation was passed earlier this year and requires each branch of the military to report to Congress twice a year on the financial health of each housing partnership, how money is being spent, and if there is a backlog of maintenance requests.
For military families living with mold issues this is a great relief.
“Obviously if a bill was introduced and signed into law, we’ve got someone in our corner. Someone actually listened to us,” said Angela Walker, one of many military wives dealing with mold issues.
“You felt like there was no hope, that nobody was listening. It was us, up against these big companies, and they were winning. Now I’m really happy there is a law helping us.”
Let’s keep our fingers crossed and hope that this new law will ensure the health and safety of military families. My sincere hope is the Canadian government and other government’s around the world will follow the lead of this new American initiative.

Does the Military Really Care About Mold?

Does the Military Really Care About Mold?
“Every single mold growing in there was high concentrated, you had staff in there that had mold growing on their clothes, on their suits, on their military uniforms, their hats,” said Brown.”
“It hurts very much that they knew this was going on, and with that information, refused to share it with us,” said Tracy Brown, a counselor at the Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Program, also known as SARP, located for almost 30 years inside building J-50.
A recent news posting-The Navy’s $10 million mold problem-highlights the problems the military is facing with mold.

Call me a cynic, but it is clear from this news report that the only reason the Navy did anything is because this story became public.
1. In 2009, Navy industrial hygienist teams found high concentrations of mold on air vents, furniture, ceiling tiles, cabinets, and inside closets all around the building. Despite the fact that personnel in the building were complaining of sicknesses, nothing was done.
2. A year later, in 2010, the same mold results were found and a power point presentation by the Lieutenant Commander Eric Pauli, the head of SARP at the time, spelled it out for the Navy Brass: “Problems with mold and the broken HVAC system adversely affect health, comfort, and safety of staff, patients, and visitors…[Mold can] grow in human tissue, and for people with weakened immune systems, this growth can eventually be fatal.”
Was anything done about this situation? NO. The military values its personnel only for one thing…to fight wars. But back in home territory, it is clear that health, particularly when it is caused by bad air quality, is a minor issue. Trillions are spent on war. Why does the United States government, Congress, and military brass fail to understand that the buildings they house their personnel in must be safe and healthy environments?
I wonder, how many other military buildings are causing the personnel to be sick? I guess we will only know if more complaints are filed and more news reports are made public.
In this case, a year after Lieutenant Pauli submitted his report and only after a formal complaint about the sick working conditions was filed was anything done. SARP moved to another building, hopefully mold free. Mold, of course, was not the official reason for the move; after all the military would not want to admit they had a problem would they! “I knew it was the mold, that’s the reason we were moving, but has it ever been said to us? No,” said Brown.
What do you think? Do you think the military actually cares and will do something? I only think something will be done if and only when enough complaints are filed and enough news reports are generated that will basically embarrass the military, Congress, and the government into taking this issue more seriously. They should, but will they? Tell me what you think!!!

Mold in the Military Update

Mold in the Military Update

“There is a common business axiom, and that is to inspect what you expect, and we all expect completely adequate housing that is clean and safe.” (Congressman Scott Rigell)

Recently CNN reported about “Mold in the Military”:
CNN Special Report – Military Mold Part 1

CNN Special Report – Military Mold Part 2

It appears that the laws for military housing may be changing to address this housing situation. Congressman Scott Rigell is introducing the Military Housing Oversight and Accountability Act which mandates the military to step in and watch over the maintenance and upkeep of both old and new housing.