We can provide lab results within 24 hours

When customers call got mold? to have a mold or asbestos inspections and sampling, we take great pride in giving our customers fast and accurate reports so they can get the work done ASAP. The health of our customers is our number one priority and we want our customers to know that your health is important to us! We thrive on having happy and healthy customers that have healthy indoor air for their families or business. When you call got mold? our environmental professionals will assist you with the best coarse of action to take when it comes to the removal process, and what should happen with the contents surrounding the effected areas.

Sometimes circumstances require that results of sampling is an urgent matter. This is why we deal with only accredited laboratories that have microbiologists analyze the samples. If there are any questions or clarification is required we are in direct contact with the Principal Microbiologist Dr. Jackson Kung’u.

The basic problem with mold is that it can be hidden. Home inspectors are not mold remediation specialists and do not have the expertise required to identify potential mold issues. Home buyers are well advised to invest in both a home inspection and mold inspection before purchasing a home, particularly if there is any indication that there are potential moisture issues.
 (Buyer Beware! How Reliable is Your Home Inspection?)
Mold occurs normally in outdoor environments, serving as nature’s recycling center and breaking down the dead organic matter from animals or plants. Humans encounter mold and even inhale mold spores every day with no ill effects whatsoever. When mold occurs in an indoor environment, however, things change. Suddenly, mold and its accompanying spores (through which it reproduces) are encountered (and inhaled) in large concentrations. When you consider the job that mold is designed to do on organic matter, it becomes easy to see how it could become a serious health hazard. (No Shame In Mold)
Since mold can cause serious health and structural issues, and even negatively impact the health of your pets, then you should invest in a mold inspection and you may even want to consider a Thermal Imaging inspection as well.
A mold inspection is vitally important if you are planning to buy a home for three key reasons:
1. REAL ESTATE AGENTS DO NOT LIKE MOLD
Real estate agents know that the presence of mold can end a real estate transaction. Since legal requirements for disclosing mold problems is not universally mandatory, then it really is up to the seller to disclose such information. If this is not done, the buyer may never know a problem even exists.
2. MOLD REMEDIATION IS COSTLY
Mold remediation is the removal of mold from a home to make it safe and liveable. This process is costlybecause the materials contaminated with mold need to be removed. You can not simply spray mold with chemicals. The cost of remediation will depend on the area that is affected and the kind of materials. In addition, mold remediation specialists take special training and follow specific procedures to prevent mold from spreading. Their goal is not only to remove the mold, but to contain it and clean it.
3. HOME INSPECTORS ARE NOT MOLD EXPERTS
The problem with mold is that it can be hidden under baseboards, beneath carpet, and under a new paint job. Home inspectors will look for visual problems with the home, but may not necessarily be able to identify a mold problem. A credible home inspector may provide you with some warning signs that conditions exist to encourage mold growth:
1. Water stains
2.  Smelly basement
3.  Water seepage
4. Leaky roof
That being said, a home inspector will not verify the existence of mold and may not specify this in their report. It is also important to understand that many home inspectors rely on referals from real estate agents, which could cause potential conflict of interest issues.
According to CMHC and Health Canada:
“Asbestos poses health risks only when fibres are in the air that people breathe. Asbestos fibres lodge in the lungs, causing scarring that can ultimately lead to severely impaired lung function (asbestosis) and cancers of the lungs or lung cavity.”
If your home or commercial building was built prior to or during the 1980s, you may need to determine if you have asbestos and/or vermiculite insulation.
The environmental and financial risks associated with asbestos abatement requires expertise and commitment.
If you have asbestos, our professional teams will remove it.
To ensure “Peace of Mind”, we will ask a third party environmental consulting firm to take air quality samples that will be sent to an independent lab for analysis.
Our job will not be complete until the environmental consultant says that the property is fully cleared of the asbestos.
Further Reading about mold removal, health concerns and the inspection processes:
Flooded…But Denied Insurance? Don’t Lose Hope!Hurricane Sandy Causes Mold Risk for Flooded AreasSandy Leaves Behind the Threat of Asbestos Exposure, Flood Alert: Key Action Steps & Information!What Should I do if I Find Mold?Attention Saskatchewan Residents: PDAP Can Help!Don’t Spray Mold!What Causes a Basement to Smell Bad?Mold, Not Just a Health Problem, But a Structural One Too!Sewer Backups Part 1: Causes and PreventionSewer Backups Part 2: Action Steps Why Do We Need Sump Pumps? Flooded…But Denied Insurance? Don’t Lose Hope!What to Expect From a Mold InspectionMold Emerges As Problem From FloodingWhy is Mold a Growing Concern?Seven Tips To Detecting MoldMold in Your BasementDo You Know Where Your Water Main Valve Is Located?What to do when you’ve identified a mold concern?The Longer You Wait…The Worse It Gets!How Does Mold Get Indoors?What’s In Your Flood Water?What causes Mold growth?
Further Reading about asbestos removal, health concerns and the inspection processes:
Mandatory Saskatchewan Registry for Asbestos PassesWhy is Asbestos a Health Hazard?Can You Get Mesothelioma from Attending School?Why is a Shower Essential to Asbestos Abatement?What Percentage of Lung Cancers are Caused by Asbestos?Canadian Asbestos RegulationsHow Many People Die From Asbestos Each Year?10 Interesting Facts About Asbestos in the USA [Infographic]Renovating? Read This Message From Our President!10 Interesting Historical Facts About Asbestos [Infographic]ADAO – Asbestos Disease Awareness OrganizationBanAsbestos.usThe Asbestos Epidemic in America, WHO | Asbestos: elimination of asbestos-related diseasesThe Jig Is Up For The Asbestos Industry!Canada’s Asbestos Industry Could End!Elliot Lake, Ontario Residents Exposed to Asbestos DustShould I Be Concerned About Asbestos?The Politics of Asbestos: Canada’s Ugly SecretQuebec Pumps $58 Million into Certain DeathThe Asbestos Abatement ProcessWhy is Asbestos so Scary?Got Asbestos?Asbestos Removal and AbatementAsbestos Is The “Ideal Carcinogen”
 

Are you ready for the winter?

Are you ready for the winter?

Winter is just around the corner. With the first few snowflakes that landed this morning and melting as it hit the ground we start thinking about the last minute fixes and things we needed to get done before the winter hits. Are you and your home ready for the cold weather? Have you done any upgrades during the summer that will allow your home to hold in more heat? Upgraded from a chimney vented furnace to an energy efficient? These type of upgrades are great however, they may cause higher humidity and in turn condensation at any cold spots such as where the drywall meets the ceiling. Getting the exterior of the home ready for the cold winds, snow and ice is critical for keeping Old Man Winter out and keeping it warm and toasty inside.

Windows and Doors

  • Check and replace if necessary all the weatherstripping around windows and doorframes for leaks to prevent heat loss, condensation and frost build up.
  • Examine wooden window frames for signs of rot or decay. Repair or replace framing to maintain structural integrity. If you believe it is mold infested and has wicked into your walls contact a professional for a mold inspection – Thermal Imaging  may be necessary and the best time to detect heat loss in your home is when it is cold outside.
  • Check for drafts around windows and doors. Caulk inside and out, where necessary, to keep heat from escaping.
  • Inspect windows for cracks, broken glass, or gaps. Repair or replace, if needed.

 

Lawn, Garden, and Deck

  • Trim overgrown branches back from the house and electrical wires to prevent iced-over or wind-swept branches from causing property damage or a power problem. In some cases it could be the cities responsibility to do this and all you usually have to do is report it. .
  • Ensure rain or snow drains away from the house to avoid foundation problems. The dirt grade — around the exterior of your home — should slope away from the house. Add clay and or extra dirt to lower areas, as necessary.
  • Clean and dry patio furniture. Cover with a heavy tarp or store inside a shed or garage to protect it from water damage or rusting.
  • Clean soil from planters. Bring pots made of clay or other fragile materials indoors. Because terra cotta pots can swell and crack, lay them on their sides in a wood carton or better yet a plastic tote.
  • Remove any attached hoses and store them away for the winter to prevent cracks, preserve their shapes, and prolong their life. Wrap outside faucets with covers to prevent water damage.
  • Shut off exterior faucets. Drain water from outdoor pipes, valves, and sprinkler heads to protect against pipe bursts. Have your sprinklers professionally blown out.
  • Inspect decks for splintering, decay, or insect damage and treat, if needed, to prevent further deterioration over the winter.
  • Clean leaves, dirt, and pine needles between the boards of wooden decks to thwart mold and mildew growth.
  • Inspect outdoor lighting around the property. Good illumination will help minimize the chance of accidents on icy walkways at night.
  • Check handrails on exterior stairs to make sure they’re well secured.

 

Tools and Machinery

  • Bring all your seasonal tools inside and spray them with a coating of lightweight oil to prevent rust. Pam cooking oils work great for this.
  • Move your snow blower and shovels to the front of the garage or shed for easy access.
  • Prepare the snow blower for the first snowfall by changing the oil and replacing the spark plug.
  • Sharpen ice chopper and inspect snow shovels to make sure they’re ready for another season of work. There is nothing worse then finding out your shovel is broken when you need it most!
  • Make sure you have an ample supply of ice melt or sand on hand for steps, walkways, and the driveway. If you rent – make sure your landlord is okay with you using salt on your walkways and always make sure to keep the salt off the grass to keep the lawn nice and green in the spring.

 

Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning

  • Inspect the firebox and flue system to ensure that they’re clean of any soot or creosote and that there aren’t any cracks or voids that could cause a fire hazard.
  • Clean or replace the air filter in your furnace for maximum efficiency and improved indoor air quality. The filter should be replaced every month for best efficiency.
  • Clean any humidifiers and replace the evaporator pad.
  • Bleed valves on any hot-water radiators to increase heating efficiency by releasing air that may be trapped inside.
  • Check that smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors are in working order. You should replace the batteries regularly just to be safe!
  • Install foam-insulating sheets behind outlets and switch plates on exterior walls to reduce outside airflow.
  • Flush a hot water heater tank to remove sediment, and check the pressure relief valve to make sure it’s in proper working order.
  • Examine exposed ducts in the attic, basement, and crawl spaces, and use a sealant such as spray foam to plug up any leaks.
  • Check and make sure the insulation in the attic is not being compromised by mice, bats or other rodents. This is a lot more common then you think!

 

Gutters, Roof, and Drains

  • Check for missing, damaged or warped shingles and replace, as necessary before you get stuck with a leak.
  • Check for deteriorated flashing at the chimney, walls, and skylights and around vent pipes. Seal joints where water could penetrate, using roofing cement and a caulking gun.
  • Rake up leaves and debris from the yard and pool storm drains to prevent blockages.
  • Check all vents and openings and make sure they are covered to prevent insects, birds, and rodents from getting inside to nest in a warm place.

 

For a mold inspection to ensure the air quality of your home is safe call us today! Peace of mind is just a phone call away! 1-888-909-6653 a friendly knowledgeable representative is always available for information and advise.

Common Air Pollutants & How To Improve Indoor Air Quality In Your Home Or Office

Common Air Pollutants & How To Improve Indoor Air Quality In Your Home Or Office
We spend most of our time indoors. We think we’re safe inside, but poor indoor air quality can put us at risk for health problems such as sore eyes, burning in the nose and throat, headaches or fatigue. Indoor air pollutants can cause or worsen allergies, respiratory illnesses (i.e. asthma), heart disease, cancer and other serious chronic conditions.
Some pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, can cause death! Take the time to learn about indoor air pollutants and you may be saving the health of yourself and others.
Common Indoor Air Pollutants

Radon
Radon is a radioactive gas that comes from soil. It can enter the indoors through cracks and openings in the floors and walls. It is the leading cause of lung cancer in nonsmokers and the second leading cause of lung cancer in general.
Secondhand Smoke
Created by burning tobacco products, secondhand smoke can cause cancer and other respiratory illnesses. In children, secondhand smoke can cause or worsen asthma symptoms and has been shown to be linked to increased risk of ear infections and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).
Combustion Pollutants
These are pollutants that come from burning materials, such as are generated from improperly vented or unvented fuel-burning appliances (space heaters, woodstoves, gas stoves, water heaters, dryers and fireplaces).
Common combustible pollutants are:
Carbon monoxide (CO) – CO is colourless and odourless gas. It can cause headaches, dizziness, weakness, nausea and death.
Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) – NO2 is a colourless and odourless gas. It can cause eye, nose and throat irritation, shortness of breath, and
  increase the risk of respiratory infection.
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)
VOCs are chemicals that evaporate from paints and lacquers, paint strippers, cleaning supplies, varnishes and waxes, pesticides, building materials and furnishings, office equipment, moth repellents, air fresheners and dry-cleaned clothing. VOCs irritate the eyes, nose and throat, and can cause headaches, nausea, organ damage, and sometimes cancer.
Asthma Triggers
Commonly found in homes, schools and offices, asthma triggers include mold, dust mites, secondhand smoke and pet dander. Mold can grow on shower curtains, dust mites can live in pillows, blankets or stuffed animals, secondhand smoke could pollute the air, and pet hair could litter the carpet or floors.
Asthma triggers cause coughing, chest tightness, wheezing and breathing problems. They can even trigger an asthma attack, which can be life threatening. Asthma triggers can be easily reduced by professional cleaning and air quality expert service.
Molds
Molds produce spores that float through the air and find damp surfaces upon which they grow. Inhaling or touching molds can cause hay fever-type symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, red eyes and skin rash.
Protect yourself and your family from indoor pollutants by contacting our office to schedule an indoor air quality test.
You can improve indoor air quality at your home or business by performing these simple steps:
1. Have an Indoor Air Quality Inspection
    One cannot control indoor pollutants if they are unknown. An indoor air quality
    inspection can identify the presence and potential sources for many pollutants.
    Give us a call to schedule a free inspection at your home or business.
2. Control the Sources of Pollution
    Ventilate the area by increasing the amount of fresh air and therefore reducing the
    concentration of indoor air pollutants.
3. Change Filters Regularly
    Change the filters in your central heaters and air conditioners. They serve to trap
    dust and other pollutants in the air.
4. Adjust the Humidity
    High humidity can increase the likelihood of mold growth. Keep indoor humidity
    30-50% by using a moisture or humidity gauge, which are available at
    most hardware stores.

If you are interested in an indoor air quality test call today for peace of mind! Serving all of Saskatchewan & Alberta.

 

A Reasoned Approach To Mold Contamination: Best Practices

A Reasoned Approach To Mold Contamination: Best Practices
got mold’s mission and quest is to create awareness and help educate consumers about the growing concerns about mold. Because of our mission, we are fortunate to be given the opportunity to work with industry experts, including Michael Pinto, who share our belief that an educated consumer will be able to make better decisions and choices. Michael currently serves as Chief Executive Officer of Wonder Makers Environmental, Inc. He has more than 30 years of safety and environmental experience from jobs in the private sector, the non-profit arena, and regulatory agencies. Michael is the author of five books, over 150 published articles, and 18 commercial training programs. Michael has graciously allowed Got Mold? to re-publish the article below so that we can share his knowledge and expertise.
Indoor air quality is a broad field that continues to impact safety, health, and environmental professionals. But the shift in focus over the last five years from general concerns such as adequate ventilation and sick building syndrome to mold contamination has caught many practitioners by surprise. Today, safety managers, industrial hygienists, loss prevention specialists, and risk assessors are frequently being asked to explain mold contamination to building occupants, the media, and the public.

Full article “A Reasoned Approach to Mold Contamination: Best Practices” See Mold Sensitized 

Deposition Of Airborne Spores On Surfaces: The Forgotten Aspect of Mold Remediation

Deposition Of Airborne Spores On Surfaces: The Forgotten Aspect of Mold Remediation
got mold’s mission and quest is to create awareness and help educate consumers about the growing concerns about mold. Because of our mission, we are fortunate to be given the opportunity to work with industry experts, including Michael Pinto, who share our belief that an educated consumer will be able to make better decisions and choices. Michael currently serves as Chief Executive Officer of Wonder Makers Environmental, Inc. He has more than 30 years of safety and environmental experience from jobs in the private sector, the non-profit arena, and regulatory agencies. Michael is the author of five books, over 150 published articles, and 18 commercial training programs. Michael has graciously allowed Got Mold? to re-publish the article below so that we can share his knowledge and expertise.
In the mold remediation industry the focus tends to be, understandably, on areas where mold is growing on building materials or contents. The EPA and the New York City (NYC) Department of Health have published guidelines that offer recommendations for personal protective equipment (PPE) and engineering controls based on the amount of visible mold growth in an area. Obviously, visible mold growth needs to be properly addressed. However, physical growth is not the only form of contamination related to mold. Spores released by mold sources can settle on surfaces that are not otherwise contaminated by mold growth. This spore deposition can remain long after the actual mold growth is removed and can continue to cause symptoms if it is not dealt with. In this article, we will discuss (1) how to determine if airborne spore deposition has impacted surfaces, (2) how to clean surfaces that have been impacted by airborne spores, and (3) how to determine if the cleaning was effective in removing the deposited mold contamination.

Full article “Deposition Of Airborne Spores On Surfaces: The Forgotten Aspect of Mold Remediation” See Mold Sensitized