Why is Asbestos a Health Hazard?

Why is Asbestos a Health Hazard?
A story released this month in Saskatchewan is calling for a mandatory registry of buildings containing asbestos. The reason is simple: asbestos is a carcinogen and eventually leads to diseases such as asbestosis and asbestos related cancer known as mesothelioma. One of the biggest concerns brought by Hurricane Sandy was the problem of asbestos exposure caused by building destruction releasing fibers in the air and concerns that Do It Yourselfers, will unknowingly expose themselves to asbestos. Asbestos is a concern that should not be taken lightly.
To bring this issue to your attention further, below are two videos. The first shows you what asbestos does to your body when it gets in your lungs and is brought to you by Work Safe BC. The second is a public service announcement by Mike Holmes, recognized as Canada’s most trusted contractor. Finally, thanks to Pinterest, I found an excellent Infographic on Mesothelioma, that explains what this disease is and it’s impact. Enjoy!
WORK SAFE BC EXPLAINS WHAT ASBESTOS DOES TO THE BODY

MIKE HOLMES WARNS DO IT YOURSELFERS ABOUT ASBESTOS

MESOTHELIOMA INFOGRAPHIC

mesothelioma_asbestos_cancer

To learn more about asbestos, check out these links.
Why is a Shower Essential to Asbestos Abatement?
What Percentage of Lung Cancers are Caused by Asbestos?
Saskatchewan, First Canadian Province, to Create Asbestos Registry
Canadian Asbestos Regulations
How Many People Die From Asbestos Each Year?
10 Interesting Facts About Asbestos in the USA [Infographic]
Renovating? Read This Message From Our President!

10 Interesting Historical Facts About Asbestos [Infographic]
ADAO – Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization
BanAsbestos.us
The Asbestos Epidemic in America
WHO | Asbestos: elimination of asbestos-related diseases
The Jig Is Up For The Asbestos Industry!
Canada’s Asbestos Industry Could End!
Elliot Lake, Ontario Residents Exposed to Asbestos Dust
Should I Be Concerned About Asbestos?
The Politics of Asbestos: Canada’s Ugly Secret
Quebec Pumps $58 Million into Certain Death
Why is Asbestos so Scary?
Got Asbestos?
Asbestos Removal and Abatement
Asbestos Is The “Ideal Carcinogen”

Why is a Shower Essential to Asbestos Abatement?

Why is a Shower Essential to Asbestos Abatement?
Earlier this week, a news article reported that a woman died from mesothelioma after years of washing her husband and son’s overall’s which were contaminated with asbestos dust. When they came home from work, they brought the asbestos fibres with them and when she washed the clothes, she breathed in the fibres and eventually died from mesothelioma.
This is a sad story, but this is a reality that many workers and their families are dealing with throughout the world where asbestos is used on a daily basis. In fact, the WHO estimates that more than 100,000 workers will die of asbestos related diseases each year. The tragic part of this reality is the fact that these workers will most likely contaminate their homes with the asbestos dust, which in turn, will negatively impact the health of their families. Asbestos is scary because of the simple fact that it causes death and should be completely banned throughout the world!
The key to ensuring long term health if asbestos is found in a home or building is to ensure that professionals are hired to remove the asbestos. The term used is “asbestos abatement“, which simply means the process of removing or containing the asbestos so that the asbestos fibres can not become airborne.
The process of removing asbestos is exactly the same as mold removal with the exception that a shower must be set up to prevent workers from taking asbestos fibres home with them.
The first step is to take samples, which should be done by a professional who sends the samples to a lab for testing. Once it is confirmed that asbestos is present, then the abatement process can begin.
The top priority of an asbestos abatement professional is to prevent asbestos fibres from traveling freely in the air. For this reason, the next step after asbestos is confirmed is to set up a proper containment so that the fibres that do become airborne are not allowed to travel outside of the contained area. Once the containment is set up with negative air pressure, the process of removing the asbestos can begin. All contaminated materials must be disposed according to industry and geological standards and regulations.
Once all asbestos materials are removed, the air quality should be tested by a Third Party environmental consultant before any reconstruction begins.
In the video below, our founder, James C. Watson, shows you what an asbestos containment is and the shower used by our workers to ensure that asbestos fibres are contained. Enjoy!
To learn more about asbestos, check out these links.
What Percentage of Lung Cancers are Caused by Asbestos?
Saskatchewan, First Canadian Province, to Create Asbestos Registry
Canadian Asbestos Regulations
How Many People Die From Asbestos Each Year?
10 Interesting Facts About Asbestos in the USA [Infographic]
Renovating? Read This Message From Our President!

10 Interesting Historical Facts About Asbestos [Infographic]
ADAO – Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization
BanAsbestos.us
The Asbestos Epidemic in America
WHO | Asbestos: elimination of asbestos-related diseases
The Jig Is Up For The Asbestos Industry!
Canada’s Asbestos Industry Could End!
Elliot Lake, Ontario Residents Exposed to Asbestos Dust
Should I Be Concerned About Asbestos?
The Politics of Asbestos: Canada’s Ugly Secret
Quebec Pumps $58 Million into Certain Death
Why is Asbestos so Scary?
Got Asbestos?
Asbestos Removal and Abatement
Asbestos Is The “Ideal Carcinogen”

How Safe Is Your Floor?

How Safe Is Your Floor?
If you live in a home built prior to 1990, chances are the floor tile and linoleum, may have asbestos in it. Asbestos was used in flooring materials to strengthen it and increase its durability.
Should you worry about this? When does this asbestos pose a hazard?
According to the Minnesota Department of Health:
Flooring that contains asbestos, when intact and in good condition, is generally considered nonfriable and is not hazardous.
Heat, water, weathering or aging can weaken flooring to the point where it is considered friable. Friable flooring includes any material containing more than 1 percent asbestos that can be crumbled, pulverized or reduced to powder with hand pressure. This includes previously nonfriable flooring material which has been damaged to the extent that it may be crumbled, pulverized or reduced to powder by hand pressure. Flooring can also be made friable during its removal. Friable materials can release asbestos fibers into the air. Once in the air, asbestos fibers present a health hazard to people who inhale those fibers.
If you suspect you have asbestos in your flooring and it has become friable, our founder and President, James C. Watson, recommends the following:
1. Do not disturb the tiles.
2. Do not sweep up or vacuum any debris.
3. Avoid walking in the area to prevent cross contamination throughout the rest of the home.
4. Shut down your HVAC system (A/C & Furnace) so that the asbestos does not spread and contaminate the air in other parts of the home.
5. Wear a N95 respirator, preferably a Magenta HEPA filter on a half face respirator.
6. Purchase an abatement HEPA vacuum.
7. Seal off the area using 6 mil poly.
8. Seal off all hot air vents and cold air returns.
9. HEPA vacuum thoroughly and wet wipe using soap and water covering every square inch including the ceiling, walls and all contents.
Got Mold? offers asbestos abatement services and has the proper equipment and trained staff to tackle any project. If you suspect you have asbestos in the floor and are concerned that some asbestos fibres are in the air, please contact us so that we can ensure the safety of your family.
To learn more about asbestos, please check out these links:
Should I Be Concerned About Asbestos?
The Asbestos Abatement Process
Why is Asbestos so Scary?
Got Asbestos?
Asbestos Removal and Abatement
Asbestos Is The “Ideal Carcinogen”
To learn more about asbestos in floor tiles, visit InspectAPedia, an online encycolopedia of building materials.

Should I Be Concerned About Asbestos?

Should I Be Concerned About Asbestos?
Recently, asbestos has been highlighted in the news because of the wrong and highly political decision made by the Quebec Government to provide a $58 million loan to the failing asbestos industry.
Got Mold? posted two articles on this subject last week:
Quebec Pumps $58 Million into Certain Death
The Politics of Asbestos: Canada’s Ugly Secret
This is a sad day in Canadian history because there was some hope that Canada would be completely out of the asbestos business in the latter part of 2011 when the Jeffrey Mine had to halt production.
You may be wondering, what exactly is asbestos and why should I be concerned?
There are many resources on the internet. I recommend the Asbestos Disease Awareness Association (ADAO) founded by Linda Reinstein because they highlight the risks of asbestos from the perspective of victims. Here are seven key facts I learned from the ADAO.
1. Asbestos is a proven human carcinogen and there is no safe level of exposure.
2. Asbestos fibers can cause asbestosis, lung and gastrointestinal cancers, and an aggressive cancer called mesothelioma. The average life expectancy of a mesothelioma patient is six – twelve months.
3. Asbestos diseases have a 10 – 50 year latency period from initial exposure to development of disease.
4. Chrysotile asbestos accounts for nearly 95% of asbestos mined and exported today. The top five asbestos producing countries are Russia, China, Brazil, Kazakhstan, and Canada.
5. 55 countries have banned asbestos, but the U.S. and Canada have not.
6. The World Health Organization estimates that 107,000 workers die annually from exposure to asbestos. Asbestos has been mined and used in a broad range of products, materials, and applications including construction, insulation, shipyards, and many other industries.
7. Asbestos fibers can be nearly 700 times smaller than human hair and are odorless, tasteless, indestructible fibers that can remain suspended in the air for seconds.
So should you be concerned? Absolutely, asbestos is scary!
Got Mold? has dealt with several asbestos abatement projects, both residential and commercial. When we take on a project, our workers wear protective gear and masks to ensure that they do not breath in asbestos fibres; even a small amount of dust is lethal.
According to Asbestos.com:
Homes and apartments built before 1980 often are filled with asbestos, needing only normal wear and tear with age to dislodge the fibers and send them airborne. Asbestos can be found in floor tiles, roofs, furnaces, plumbing, appliances, fireplaces and window caulking, leaving most everyone vulnerable.
Click here to review a detailed diagram of where asbestos can be found in your home.
As the diagram indicates, there are many areas in a home where asbestos can be found. Take a moment and review this asbestos image gallery.
With this in mind, our advice to homeowners is to be careful if they take on a Do It Yourself (DIY) project. Don’t rush into a project that could potentially disturb and release asbestos fibres into the air. And if you are unsure if you have asbestos in your home, contact a professional for a thorough asbestos inspection and assessment.
Take 5 and Stay Alive, it could be the most important 5 minutes of your life!

Did Queen of Disco, Donna Summer, Die From Asbestos?

Image Courtesy of TMZ

Did Queen of Disco, Donna Summer, Die From Asbestos?
On May 17th, Donna Summer died of lung cancer.
According to some reports, she is the latest victim of the toxic dust caused by the 9/11 attacks. So far it has been reported that around 1,000 people exposed to the dust have died
The five-time Grammy winner known for hits like “Love To Love You Baby,” “Bad Girls” and “Hot Stuff”, believes that her cancer developed after inhaling the toxic dust, likely contaminated with asbestos. Other contaminants in the 9/11 dust included lead, mercury, and many more, including aerosolized Portland Cement which is a binding agent for mortar and concrete and highly toxic when exposed to high temperatures.
Many first-responders have become ill and it is believed that asbestos-contaminated dust may be one of the major causes.